Suspend Your Disbelief

Ian Ross Singleton

Contributor

Ian Ross Singleton is a writer, translator, and professor of Writing at Baruch College. His short stories, translations, reviews, and essays have appeared in journals such as New Madrid, Digital Americana, Midwestern GothicFiddleblack, Asymptote, and Ploughshares. His short-story collection manuscript, Grow Me Up, was a finalist for the 2017 Tartt Fiction Award. He was a student at the University of Michigan and earned an MFA in Fiction from Emerson College. At the University of Michigan, Ian won a Hopwood Award. He has taught Creative Writing and Literature for New York Writers Workshop, PrisonWrites!, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at San Francisco State University, Cogswell Polytechnical College, the Cambridge Writers’ Workshop, the Prison University Project, and the PEN Prison Writing Program.


Articles

Reviews |

Black Holes and Blue Windows: Truth and Fiction in Aetherial Worlds

“It’s these aetherial worlds referred to in the title, these never-existing possibilities that Tolstaya explores through her writing. Texts, stories, are the essences that construct our lives. Whether consciously or unconsciously, whether intentionally fabricating or telling our version of the truth, we’re creating, with language, a narrative.”


Essays |

Little Histories in Svetlana Alexievich’s Secondhand Time

“By allowing the reader to hear these voices, their pravda, instead of her own, Alexievich can better give voice to the feelings of disenfranchisement many witnesses feel in the current, capitalist Russia”: Ian Singleton tackles truth, translation, and history in Svetlana Alexievich’s Secondhand Time.


Essays |

Of Translation and Politics in Russian Literature

“What is the purpose of one culture translating another? One reason Slavic departments thrive during political crises would seem to be so that we can better understand the cultures of the post-Soviet East. Another reason, though, may be something more akin to the motives of the CIA in translating Doctor Zhivago.”


Reviews |

Apollo in the Grass: Selected Poems, by Aleksandr Kushner

In the introduction to their forthcoming translation of Apollo in the Grass: Selected Poems, by Aleksandr Kushner, Carol Ueland and Robert Carnevale write that “translators simply have to admit that most of the music of most all lyric poetry, and most of its phenomenal presence, stay at home, in the native tongue. But ‘music of language’ is a metaphor.” Ian Singleton examines how this claim plays out in their translation of Kushner’s poetry.


Reviews |

Andrei Bitov’s Translingual Novel The Symmetry Teacher

The Symmetry Teacher and its Russian version have a different relationship than the traditional one of a translation to an original. The additions and augmentations alone suggest this. The Symmetry Teacher is a bilingual or interlingual novel. Perhaps translingual is the term for it, since the novel refers back to its previous versions.”



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