Suspend Your Disbelief

Natalie Bakopoulos

Contributing Editor

Natalie Bakopoulos is the author of The Green Shore (Simon & Schuster, 2012), which takes place in Athens and Paris between 1967 and 1973. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Ninth Letter, Salon, Granta, Glimmer Train, Virginia Quarterly Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Iowa Review, The Millions, The New York Times, and the 2010 PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories. Her book reviews appear regularly in the San Francisco Chronicle. She’s the recipient of fellowships from the Camargo Foundation, the Sozopol Fiction Seminars, and the MacDowell Colony. In 2014-2015 she was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Greece. She is on the Creative Writing faculty at Wayne State University.


Articles

Reviews |

Sag Harbor, by Colson Whitehead

Colson Whitehead’s fourth novel, Sag Harbor, is driven not by plot but by time, by the fleetingness of summer and its constant reminder of that fleetingness. The beginning is slow, with the sense of months ahead, time to digress and ponder and imagine and internalize, with the thickest, most dense prose socked in the middle of July, the more desperate, urgent bursts as we careen toward Labor Day. The writing is wonderfully languorous throughout, like summer itself, and a perfect match for adolescence: unrestrained and indulgent but wonderfully self-conscious as well.


Shop Talk |

new review on FWR: Sag Harbor by Colson Whitehead

Natalie Bakopoulos is the author of The Green Shore (Simon & Schuster, 2012), which takes place in Athens and Paris between 1967 and 1973. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Ninth Letter, Salon, Granta, Glimmer Train, Virginia Quarterly Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Iowa Review, The Millions, The New York Times, and the 2010 PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories. Her book reviews appear regularly in the San Francisco Chronicle. She’s the recipient of fellowships from the Camargo Foundation, the Sozopol Fiction Seminars, and the MacDowell Colony. In 2014-2015 she was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Greece. She is on the Creative Writing faculty at […]


Shop Talk |

How Fiction Works Discussion Review: "Realism" in Fiction

Natalie Bakopoulos is the author of The Green Shore (Simon & Schuster, 2012), which takes place in Athens and Paris between 1967 and 1973. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Ninth Letter, Salon, Granta, Glimmer Train, Virginia Quarterly Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Iowa Review, The Millions, The New York Times, and the 2010 PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories. Her book reviews appear regularly in the San Francisco Chronicle. She’s the recipient of fellowships from the Camargo Foundation, the Sozopol Fiction Seminars, and the MacDowell Colony. In 2014-2015 she was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Greece. She is on the Creative Writing faculty at […]


Reviews |

Netherland, by Joseph O'Neill

Most reviews of Netherland have focused on the relationship between two main male characters, Chuck and Hans, and on the dramatic and emblematic role of cricket in the novel. Yet a quieter but equally resonant storyline–the unraveling of Hans and Rachel’s marriage–seems to have been labeled by critics as secondary, or even undeveloped. Perhaps this is because so-called important books don’t deal with issues of domesticity and marriage. Or, if they do, we’re quick to give them another, more important label as well: a book about identity, or politics, or globalization, or exile.


Reviews |

Enlightenment, by Maureen Freely

Near the middle of Maureen Freely’s Enlightenment, one character explains to another that in Turkey, “the first thing they make you do in a murder case is put you through a reenactment.” One of the book’s central storylines explores the supposed murder of a mentor of a group of leftist students in Istanbul in the early 1970s. And the novel itself functions as a reenactment, a piecing together of stories and perspectives. But Enlightenment is far more than a murder mystery: it’s about imperialism and politics and human rights, about love and memory, about the subjectivity of truth.




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