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the Breadloaf Writers' Conference / photo c. Middlebury College

the Breadloaf Writers' Conference / photo c. Middlebury College

Shadow of the Colossus

Shadow of the Colossus

Aravind Adiga / copyright: Mark Pringle

Aravind Adiga / copyright: Mark Pringle

From now on, I’m going to announce here when we’ve posted a new review, interview, or essay to the site. For those of you who usually just read the blog, please stop by and check out our most recent features:

(1) FWR’s first foray into erotica comes from our Canadian correspondent and Black Heart Magazine‘s editor-in-chief Laura Roberts, who spices things up with a review of Best Sex Writing 2009 by Rachel Kramer Bussel.

(2) Contributing Editor Lee Thomas offers a glowing review of Chris Cleave’s second novel, Little Bee, the story of two women — a British journalist and a Nigerian refugee — bound together by a traumatic event.

(3) Thinking too much about the marketability of your fiction? Well, stop it. And read this thoughtful essay, “Drawing a Line in the Sand: Literature and Today’s Market,” by Wifeshopping author Steven Wingate.

(4) Gwen Glazer reviews the English translation of Israeli writer A.B. Yehoshua’s Friendly Fire, a novel that never once uses the shortcut phrase “Israeli-Palestinian conflict.”

(5) Poet Christine Hartzler explores in this beautiful essay why writers (and all people, really) need monsters — and why video games are not about monsters, even when they are.

(6) In his review of Daniel Chacón’s Hudson Prize-winning collection, Unending Rooms, Greg Schutz calls the book “smart and charming, fascinating and frustrating by turns. Like that of Borges, Chacón’s fiction springs from a powerful intellect at play, but in the latter’s case that rich intelligence sometimes elevates concept over character.”

(7) In this interview, Lee Thomas talks with Aravind Adiga about neo-realism, myth, being a misfit, and winning the Booker Prize for his debut novel, The White Tiger.


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