Suspend Your Disbelief

Posts Tagged ‘Mary Stewart Atwell’

Shop Talk |

Book of the Week: Wild Girls, by Mary Stewart Atwell

We’re particularly pleased to feature Mary Stewart Atwell’s debut novel Wild Girls as our current Book of the Week, because Atwell is one of our contributors. She received her MFA from Washington University in St. Louis, where she is months away from finishing a Ph.D. in literature, and over the last several years it’s been our great pleasure to publish her reviews and interviews on FWR. Her short fiction has appeared in Epoch, Alaska Quarterly Review, Faultline, and other journals, and in the anthologies Best New American Voices and Best American Mystery Stories. She lives in Missouri with her husband […]


Interviews |

Not Just Visible But Beautiful: An Interview with Kevin Brockmeier

Known for stories and novels that force us to question the conventional dichotomy between realist and fantasy fiction, Kevin Brockmeier knows how to reveal the strangeness of the world around us. In conversation with Mary Stewart Atwell, Brockmeier discusses his new novel, The Illumination, and the compelling metaphors that inform his writing.


Interviews |

Starting with Small Moments: An Interview with Andrew Porter

Andrew Porter is the author of The Theory of Light and Matter, which won the 2007 Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction and was recently republished by Vintage. Each one of these critically acclaimed stories is beautifully paced and plotted–a veritable nesting box–and full of lovely sentences you’ll want to read aloud just for the pleasure of it.

In this interview, Porter discusses how crafting stories is like editing film; what particular advantages peripheral narrators can afford; and why it’s “completely surreal” to hear actors read from your work.


Interviews |

Creative Writing and the University: an Interview with Mark McGurl

McGurl, a professor of English at UCLA, is a literary scholar who actually likes writers. More amazingly, he likes MFA programs. In The Program Era, published by Harvard University Press, McGurl argues that the rise of the MFA program in the twentieth century made a uniquely significant contribution to the excellence of postwar American literature.




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