Suspend Your Disbelief

Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

Reviews |

A Meaning for Wife, by Mark Yakich

“There are people who talk about themselves in the first person, people who talk about themselves in the third person, and people who don’t talk about themselves at all,” says a character in A Meaning for Wife. Yet poet Mark Yakich’s debut novel is narrated–quite successfully–in the controversial second-person.


Shop Talk |

Book-of-the-Week Winners: Fimbul-Winter

Last week we featured Fimbul-Winter, by Debra Allbery, as our Book-of-the-Week title, and we’re pleased to announce the winners. Congratulations to: Ashlie F. Harper (@ashliefharper) margie at justbooks (@justbooks) David (@notsolinear) To claim your free copy, please email us at the following address: winners [at] fictionwritersreview.com If you’d like to be eligible for future giveaways, please visit our Twitter Page and “follow” us!


Essays |

A Story Teller’s Story, A Poet’s Beginnings

Poet Debra Albery examines the influence of Sherwood Anderson on her writing, and on her understanding of her own history and place. She writes: “If I came into writing feeling largely without history or place, writing became a means of discovering both; it also became … a means of discovering a way out, the road ahead. Sherwood Anderson gave me a map.”


Shop Talk |

Under the Influence… of Stanley Plumly

When I was an MFA student at the University of Maryland, Stanley Plumly said two things about my poetry that have stuck with me and shaped not only how I think about my writing process but also how I approach teaching creative writing. In one conference, he asked, Will you ever write a ten-syllable line? Stanley Plumly is fond of John Keats’s work, so maybe he did want me to write in ten-syllable lines, but the question was designed to force to me think about formal choices I was making. My initial, silent response was that I was experimenting with […]


Shop Talk |

Poetry bomber

Ever hear of knitbombing? Well, now, there’s poetry bombing. Galleycat reports: Miami artist Agustina Woodgate illustrated the art of “poetry bombing,” sewing snippets of poems into thrift store clothes. Here’s a video: Poetry is so well suited for this, but can you imagine fiction bombing? Little snippets of short stories or knockout lines from novels hidden… anywhere?


Essays |

Some Thoughts on Reviewing Poetry in 2011

In the final essay in our series on criticism, Keith Taylor recalls the pleasure of a “chance to review a new collection of poems in a place where several thousand people might read it, and to actually be paid something for our labors.” Has the Internet created room for “a more expansive tone to the discussion of contemporary poetry” – or made an already diminishing realm more clubby? Taylor’s experience as both poet and reviewer reveals the shaping potential of creating art and criticism.




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