Suspend Your Disbelief

Essays

Essays |

Eye of the Storm: Interlude in the Penultimate Space (Part II: Trevor’s “Le Visiteur”)

“Like the eye of a passing storm, these interludes bring a necessary interruption, a pause that allows us (not to mention the characters themselves) to have the time needed to process the stories’ crises before facing their conclusions.” In the second half of this craft essay, Alyson Mosquera Dutemple explores the “penultimate space”—between crisis and resolution—in William Trevor’s “Le Visiteur.”


Essays |

Eye of the Storm: Interlude in the Penultimate Space (Part I: Berriault’s “The Stone Boy”)

“Like the eye of a passing storm, these interludes bring a necessary interruption, a pause that allows us (not to mention the characters themselves) to have the time needed to process the stories’ crises before facing their conclusions.” In the first half of this craft essay, Alyson Mosquera Dutemple explores the “penultimate space”—between crisis and resolution—in Gina Berriault’s “The Stone Boy.”


Essays |

Gyre Journeys: How Twains of Theme and Plot Meet in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being (Part II)

“An ocean gyre is a spiral of currents—formed by the combined forces of global wind patterns and the earth’s rotation—that can swivel up to 330 feet below the water, just like a theme is a dynamically layered mass beneath the front story, or surface, of a novel”: Candace Walsh takes an ocean-deep dive into Ruth Ozeki’s 2013 novel A Tale for the Time Being.


Essays |

Gyre Journeys: How Twains of Theme and Plot Meet in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being (Part I)

“An ocean gyre is a spiral of currents—formed by the combined forces of global wind patterns and the earth’s rotation—that can swivel up to 330 feet below the water, just like a theme is a dynamically layered mass beneath the front story, or surface, of a novel”: Candace Walsh takes an ocean-deep dive into Ruth Ozeki’s 2013 novel A Tale for the Time Being.


Essays |

Safe and Sound: The Indelible Narratives of Lucia Berlin

“Farrar, Straus and Giroux published Welcome Home alongside a new collection of Lucia Berlin’s short stories, Evening in Paradise, on the same day as the midterm elections last week. A knowing wink from the publisher to the politics that these books contain? Perhaps.”




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