Suspend Your Disbelief

Jennifer Solheim

Contributing Editor

Jennifer Solheim is the Associate Director of the BookEnds novel revision fellowship of Southampton Arts at StonyBrook University. Her short stories and essays have appeared in the Bellevue Literary Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Pinch, and Poets & Writers. She is the author of The Performance of Listening in Postcolonial Francophone Literature (2018, Liverpool University Press), and holds a PhD in French from the University of Michigan and an MFA in fiction from the Bennington Writing Seminars.

 


Articles

Essays |

From Awareness to Feeling: The Art of Telling

Jennifer Solheim on the art of telling in Nathacha Appanah’s Tropic of Violence, examining how the author’s “use of perspective and authority might serve as an example of how writers can develop characters whose social identities are different from their own, in ways that are palpable, believable, and move beyond empathy.”


Interviews |

Open Secrets: An Interview with Carrie Messenger

“I love that short stories are tales—that you need to hold somebody’s attention the way you would if you were talking to them. With novels, it’s a Scheherazade situation, and you’re trying to get them to come back and stay.” Carrie Messenger talks with Jennifer Solheim about her debut collection, as well as fairy tales, Eastern European history, translation, and more.


Essays |

Safe and Sound: The Indelible Narratives of Lucia Berlin

“Farrar, Straus and Giroux published Welcome Home alongside a new collection of Lucia Berlin’s short stories, Evening in Paradise, on the same day as the midterm elections last week. A knowing wink from the publisher to the politics that these books contain? Perhaps.”


Reviews |

The Monstrous Complicity of Leila Slimani’s The Perfect Nanny

“In Slimani’s novel, the burden placed upon women to care for children balances alongside the treatment and perceptions of immigrant women. And rendering these issues to subtext, rather than treating them head-on and politically, the narrative forces the reader to become complicit in the shoddy treatment of others for the sake of convenience and creature comforts.”