Suspend Your Disbelief

Posts Tagged ‘historical fiction’

Interviews |

Gifts and Constraints: An Interview with Caitlin Horrocks

“My most general advice to writers working on historical fiction is to do as I say, and not as I did, and to try to relax at least a little, and trust in both the power, and the necessity, of imagination”: Caitlin Horrocks talks with Marian Crotty about her novel, The Vexations, as well as how short fiction helped her prepare for a longer project, her work as an editor at Kenyon Review, and more.


Interviews |

An Interview with John Vanderslice

“To bring the scene vividly alive in your mind and then to transfer that vividness to the reader takes imagination. There’s no way around that. This is why History and Historical Fiction are two separate genres.” John Vanderslice talks to Garry Craig Powell about his new novel, The Last Days of Oscar Wilde.


Interviews |

A Recipe for Better Understanding the Human Condition: An Interview with Mandy Mikulencak

“Food is a central character in this book because food fulfills a central role in our lives”: Mandy Mikulencak chats with Kate Lemery about historical fiction, getting published, and The Last Suppers, her new book out now from Kensington’s John Scognamiglio imprint.


Essays |

Looking Backward: Third-Generation Fiction Writers and the Holocaust

From the Archives: as the annual observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) approaches this Sunday, we return to a 2011 essay by Erika Dreifus on the literary kinship among fictional works from an emerging cohort of “3G” (third-generation) Jewish writers: Julie Orringer, Alison Pick, and Natasha Solomons.




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